Talking through the the multiplication and division process in Count like and Egyptian with my younger son

For today’s project I tried a little challenge – I had my younger son read the first chapter in the wonderful book Count like and Egyptian and then we talked about what he learned. Here’s the book and and link to Evelyn Lamb’s review of it:

Evelyn Lamb’s review of Count like an Egyptian

The goal for today was more for him to talk through what he learned as opposed to getting the math details right. We definitely had a few stumbles, but it was still fun and the multiplication and division ideas are really neat.

Here’s the introduction to the book and the arithmetic ideas:

Next I asked my son to talk through a few multiplication problems:

Finally we wrapped up a division problem.

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Revisiting Graham’s number

We had only a short time this morning for a project. At this point I should know better than to rush things, but I don’t!

Based on some twitter conversations this week I thought it would be fun to revisit talking about Graham’s number. We’ve done several projects on Graham’s number in the past, but not in at least a few years.

To get started, I asked the boys what they remembered:

Next we talked about one of the simple properties of Graham’s number (and power towers) -> they get big really quickly!

Here we talked about why 3^3^3^3^3 is already as about as large as one of the usual “large” properties listed for Graham’s number. Namely, you couldn’t write down all the digits of this number if you put 1 digit in each Planck volume of the universe:

Next we talked through how to find the last couple of digits of Graham’s number. This part of the project is something that I thought would go quickly, but didn’t at all. Still, it is pretty amazing that you can find the last few digits even though there’s next to nothing you can say about Graham’s number.

If you search for “Graham’s Number” in my blog or in google, you’ll find some other ideas that are fun to explore with kids. I highly recommend Evelyn Lamb’s article, too:

Evelyn Lamb’s amazing article about Graham’s number

Sharing Patrick Honner’s My Favorite Theorem appearance with kids

Patrick Honner was a terrific guest on the My Favorite Theorem blog today:

We’d done a blog post – inspired by Patrick Honner, obviously – about Varignon’s Theorem previously – Varignon’s Theorem – inspired by this tweet:

After listening to today’s My Favorite Theorem episode I wanted to do a follow up project – probably this weekend – but then I saw a really neat tweet just as I finished listening:

Well . . . I had to build that from our Zometool set and ended up finding a fun surprise, too. I shared the surprise shape with my older son tonight and here’s what he had to say:

What a fun day! If you are interested in a terrific (and light!) podcast about math – definitely subscribe to My Favorite Theorem.

Sharing a Craig Kaplan post with kids

I saw the latest post from Craig Kaplan via a tweet from Patrick Honner:

The picture in the middle part of the post looked like something that kids could understand:

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For our project today I thought it would be fun to talk about how to make the polygon tile in the above picture. After we understand how to describe that polygon, we can 3d print a bunch of the tiles and talk more about the idea of “surrounding a polygon” with these tiles tomorrow.

This project is a fun introduction to 2d geometry (and especially coordinate geometry) for kids. We also use the slope / intercept form of a line when we make the shape.

We got started by looking at Kaplan’s post:

Next we began to talk about how to make the shape – the main idea here involves basic properties of 30-60-90 triangles. My older son was familiar with those ideas but they were new to my younger son.

We also talk a little bit about coordinate geometry. The boys spend a lot of time discussing which point they should select to be the origin.

In the last video we found the coordinates of 3 of the points. Now we began the search for the coordinates of the other two. We mainly use the ideas of 30-60-90 triangles to find the coordinates of the first point.

The 2nd point was a bit challenging, though:

The next part of the project was spent searching for the coordinates of the last point. The main idea here was from coordinate geometry -> finding the coordinates of the middle of the square. The coordinate geometry concepts here were difficult for my younger son but we eventually were able to write down the coordinates of the final point:

We were running a little long in the last video, so I broke the video into two pieces. The last step of the calculation is here:

After finding all of the coordinates we went upstairs to make the shape on Mathematica. We used the function “RegionPlot3D” that allows us to define a region bordered by a bunch of lines. Below is a recap of the process we went through to make the shape and a quick look at the shapes in the 3d printing software:

This isn’t our first 3d printing / tiling project. Some prior ones are linked in a project we did last month after seeing an incredible article by Evelyn Lamb:

Evelyn Lamb’s pentagons are everything

I’m excited with the boys to play with the tiles from Kaplan’s post tomorrow.

 

Evelyn Lamb’s pentagons are everything

Last week Evelyn Lamb published a fantastic article:

Math Under My Feet

In a way – a super serious way – I don’t want you to read this blog post. I want you read her article and just think about some of the properties that the tiling pentagons in article probably have.

The question that same to my mind was this one -> Why are the pentagons in her article Type 1 pentagons?

The resources I used initially to help with this question were:

(i) the pictures of the different tiling patterns in the article:

Tiling Pentagons

(ii) Laura Taalman’s Tiling Pentagon resource on Thingiverse:

(iii) and then when I was stumped and wrote to Evelyn she pointed me to the Wikipedia page for tiling pentagons – which is really good!

Wikipedia’s page on pentagon tilings

So, honestly, stop here and play around. You don’t have to have the nearly week long adventure with these pentagons that I did, but I promise that you will enjoy trying to figure out the amazing properties of this damn shape!

If that adventure is interesting to you, I think you’ll also find that sharing that adventure with students learning algebra and geometry would be pretty fun, too!

Here are some of our previous pentagon tiling projects:

Using Laura Taalman’s 3d Printed Pentagons to talk math with kids

Learning about tiling pentagons from Laura Taalman and Evelyn Lamb

Tiling Pentagon Cookies

Also, here are the first two projects that I did with the boys after reading Evelyn Lamb’s latest article:

Evelyn Lamb’s Tiling Pentagons

Using Evelyn Lamb’s tiling pentagons to talk about lines and shapes with kids

The problem with those last two projects is that they aren’t actually right. I hadn’t properly understood the shape . . . dang 😦

With a bit more study, though, I did *finally* understand this damn shape!!

So, I printed 16 of them and set off on one more project with the boys tonight. The goal was to show them the 3 completely different tilings of the plane that you can make with Evelyn Lamb’s pentagon.

I won’t say much about the videos except that watching them I hope that you will see that (i) this is a great way to talk about geometry with kids (building the shapes is a great way to talk about algebra), and (ii) that understanding these tiling patterns is much harder than you think it is going to be. As an example of the 2nd point, it takes the boys nearly 10 minutes to make the tiling pattern in Lamb’s article.

So, here’s how things went:

(1) An introduction to the problem:

(2) Using the pentagons to make the “standard” Type I tiling pattern

This tiling pattern is in the upper left hand corner of the picture above that shows the collection of pentagon tiling patterns.

 

(3) Using the pentagons to make the “pgg (22x)” tiling pattern from the Wikipedia article:

Pentagon2.jpg

(4) Part I of trying to make the tiling pattern in Evelyn Lamb’s article:

Untitled copy.jpg

(5) Part 2 of Evelyn Lamb’s tiling pattern:

Don’t really know what else to add. I think playing around with the math required to make these pentagons AND playing with the pentagons themselves is one of the most exciting algebra / geometry projects for kids that I’ve ever come across.

I’m so grateful for Evelyn Lamb’s article. It is really cool to see how a mathematician views the world and it is so fun to take her thoughts and ideas and turn them into projects for kids

Evelyn Lamb’s tiling pentagons

Since the 15th tiling pentagon was discovered in 2015 we’ve done some fun projects with tiling pentagons. A key component in all of our project was Laura Taalman’s incredible work that made all 15 pentagon tilings accessible to everyone:

Here are a few of those projects:

Using Laura Taalman’s 3d Printed Pentagons to talk math with kids

Learning about tiling pentagons from Laura Taalman and Evelyn Lamb

and, of course, pentagon cookies 🙂

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Tiling Pentagon Cookies

Evelyn Lamb has also written some absolutely fantastic articles on tiling pentagons. Here original article on the subject was critical in helping me understand what was going on in the different tilings:

There’s Something about Pentagons by Evelyn Lamb

And her amazing article from last week (April 2017) inspired today’s project:

Math Under My Feet

The prep work for this project was probably 100x more than I usually do because the tiling described in Lamb’s article turned out to be very hard for me to understand. It didn’t look like the “type I” tiling pictured in the article and I spent days trying to see if it was somehow a sneaky form of one of the other tilings.

Finally I wrote to Lamb and asked her about it and she pointed me to the Wikipedia page here which showed that the type 1 tilings have two different forms. One form has a repeating pattern with 2 pentagons and the other has a repeating pattern with 4 pentagons. Ahhhhhh – at last I saw what I was missing and why this “new to me” type 1 tiling was so elusive:

Wikipedia’s page on pentagon tilings

So, having finally understood what was going on with this octagon / pentagon tiling, I got to work making some of the pentagons. I didn’t quite match the pentagons in Lamb’s article, but the ones I made still have the property that they can produce two different tilings.

I got started this morning by having the kids read Lamb’s new article. Here’s what they thought:

Next I had the boys try to make a tiling from the pentagons I made last night. They made the first type of tiling (the one that has two repeating pentagons) and we talked about whether or not that was the tiling in Lamb’s article.

I include the whole process of finding the tiling here to show that even a tiling with two repeating pentagons isn’t so easy to find as you might think.

Now we went to the both Lamb’s article and to the Wikipedia pentagon tiling page to study the various different types of Type I tilings. I’m still a little confused as to what makes tilings different, but however the classification works, here’s our discussion of the various Type I tilings.

Off camera I had the boys try to make the new type of tiling. It took a while (though not super long – from the time they started reading the article until the time we finished the project was roughly 30 min).

Once they had the tilings I turned on the camera to talk about the shapes:

This was such a fun project! Tomorrow I hope to do a second project to show how making these pentagons is a great way to help kids learn about / review basic properties of lines.

A zipper Möbius strip from Mathjams

Saw this tweet yesterday:

A few weeks ago we’d done another Möbius strip-related project I saw in one of James Tanton’s books:

An absolutely mind-blowing project from James Tanton

After seeing the re-tweet from Mathjams I thought it would be fun to try this project, too. I ran to Joann Fabrics and found some 48 inch zippers and my wife helped me figure out how to make the shape. She did the sewing and commented that she was surprised that the pins we had holding the shape together started on once side and ended up on the other side! So, there’s a neat “what do you notice” math and sewing project here, too. See also:

How to sew like a mathematician by Evelyn Lamb

I had each kid go talk about the shape separately so that the other kid’s ideas wouldn’t spoil theirs. Here’s what my younger son had to say as he played with the shape:

and here’s what my older son had to say:

I love this shape and exploring it is a great math project for kids (and probably for everyone!). Thanks to Mathsjam and to Andrew Taylor for sharing it.