Tiling pentagon cookies

Last year a 15th tiling pentagon pattern was discovered ( See this incredible article by Evelyn Lamb for more info) and Laura Taalman showed how to 3d print all of the patterns:

 

Her print patterns went well beyond just plain old pentagons, though.  She even included cookie cutter versions that we used for a really fun project for kids:

 

Using Laura Taalman’s 3D printed pentagons to talk math with kids

You know what we never did with those cookie cutters, though . . . ACTUALLY MAKE COOKIES.

I was reminded of that terrible failure when I saw this really cool video about shapes from Eugenia Cheng last week:

After watching the video I wrote up a quick post about how you could extend a few of the ideas that Cheng discusses.

Extending Eugenia Cheng’s “shapes” video

Today it was time to make cookies!

We started by watching Cheng’s video (the kids were on vacation with their cousins last week, so they hadn’t see it) and reviewing Taalman’s 3D printing site on Thingiverse. Oh, sorry about the hiccups . . . :

Yesterday I had the boys each pick a pentagon to play with. Using the numbering in Taalman’s project my younger son picked #10 and my older son picked #8. I printed 24 of each pentagon and had the boys play around and try to discover the tiling pattern.

Here’s my older son discussing the tiling pattern for #8 which was actually very difficult to find:

Here’s my younger son talking about finding the tiling pattern for pentagon #10. I got a bit of a surprise when he found a tiling pattern that was completely different than the tiling pattern that Taalman showed for #10.

I think that this different pattern is actually part of the family of pentagons from pentagon #1 in Taalman’s list, but I’m not sure. It was definitely fun that he found an alternate way to tile with this pentagon.

We finished up with what was obviously the most important part of the project – making cookies! Here are the cookies being cut out. Unfortunately the tiling pattern with pentagon #8 needs a flipped over version, so we didn’t think we could make the tiling pattern with the cookie cutter we had.

The patterns for #10 both work, though, and my younger son made each of them:

So, a great project today thanks to Laura Taalman and Eugenia Cheng. Can’t wait to try out the cookies!

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